Renal oncocytoma

What causes a renal oncocytoma?

The exact underlying cause of most renal oncocytomas is unknown. However, researchers suspect that acquired (not present at birth) changes in mitochondrial DNA may play a role in the development of some of these tumors.

Renal oncocytomas sometimes occur in people with certain genetic syndromes such as tuberous sclerosis complex and Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome. In these cases, affected people often have multiple and bilateral (affecting both kidneys) oncocytomas and may also have family members with these tumors. When renal oncocytomas are part of a genetic syndrome, they are caused by changes (mutations) in a specific gene. Tuberous sclerosis complex is caused by mutations in the TSC1 gene or TSC2 gene, while Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome is caused by mutations in the FLCN gene.

Last updated on 05-01-20

How is renal oncocytoma diagnosed?

A diagnosis of renal oncocytoma is often suspected based on imaging studies such as computed tomography (CT scan) and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scan). However, it can be difficult to differentiate a renal oncocytoma from renal cell carcinoma based on imaging studies alone. Although researchers are currently studying several new techniques for the diagnosis of renal oncocytoma, a biopsy is often needed to confirm the diagnosis.

Last updated on 05-01-20

Is a renal oncocytoma inherited?

Most renal oncocytomas are not inherited. They usually occur sporadically in people with no family history of tumors. However, in rare cases, they can occur in people with certain genetic syndromes such as tuberous sclerosis complex and Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome. Both of these conditions are inherited in an autosomal dominant manner.

Last updated on 05-01-20

What is a renal oncocytoma?

Renal oncocytoma is a benign (noncancerous) growth of the kidney. They generally do not cause any signs or symptoms and are often discovered incidentally (by chance) while a person is undergoing diagnostic imaging for other conditions. Some people with renal oncocytoma will have abdominal or flank pain; blood in the urine; and/or an abdominal mass. Although these tumors can occur in people of all ages, they most commonly develop in men who are over age 50. The exact underlying cause of most isolated (single tumor affecting one kidney) renal oncocytomas is unknown; however, multiple and bilateral (affecting both kidneys) renal oncocytomas sometimes occur in people with certain genetic syndromes such as tuberous sclerosis complex and Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome. Although many benign tumors do not require treatment unless they are causing unpleasant symptoms, it can be difficult to confidently differentiate a renal oncocytoma from renal cell carcinoma. Most affected people are, therefore, treated with surgery which allows for confirmation of the diagnosis.

Last updated on 05-01-20

How large can renal oncocytoma become?

Though there does not appear to be a consensus in the medical literature, we did identify several retrospective studies reporting the range of tumor sizes in included subjects. This information may be lacking as oncocytoma are typically managed with surgery as part of the diagnostic process and/or once symptoms are present. The largest measurement we found in our review was 16 cm, although many of the studies reported a tumor measurement between 8-11 cm as the largest.

Last updated on 05-01-20

Do renal oncocytoma need to be removed once they reach a certain size?

Management of renal oncocytoma varies on a case-by-case basis. While studies suggest that most individuals with renal oncocytoma report symptoms once tumor size is greater than 5 cm, there are several factors taken into account when considering management options. These factors might include: manifesting symptoms, tumor growth rate, existing comorbidities, and the development of metastasis. We would recommend that you discuss your concerns with your physicians as they are aware of your medical history and whether the renal oncocytoma is progressing.

Last updated on 05-01-20

What is the long-term outlook for people with renal oncocytoma?

The long-term outlook (prognosis) for people with a sporadic (not part of a genetic syndrome) renal oncocytoma is generally good. These tumors are most often benign and metastasis is very rare. After renal oncocytomas are surgically removed, they typically don't recur. The lifespan of affected people is usually not impacted by the tumor.

When a renal oncocytoma is part of a genetic syndrome such as tuberous sclerosis complex and Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome, the prognosis varies based on the other associated signs and symptoms.

Last updated on 05-01-20

How might renal oncocytoma be treated?

Most renal oncocytomas are benign (non-cancerous) and metastasis is very rare. Although many benign tumors do not require treatment unless they are causing unpleasant symptoms, it can be difficult to confidently differentiate a renal oncocytoma from renal cell carcinoma based on diagnostic imaging tests alone. Most people are, therefore, treated with surgery which allows for confirmation of the diagnosis. If a renal oncocytoma is strongly suspected prior to surgery, a more conservative procedure such as a partial nephrectomy, may be performed.

Last updated on 05-01-20

Name: National Kidney Foundation 30 East 33rd Street
New York, NY, 10016, United States
Phone: 212-889-2210 Toll Free: 800-622-9010 Fax : 212-689-9261 Email: info@kidney.org Url: https://www.kidney.org/
Name: American Association of Kidney Patients 3505 E. Frontage Rd., Suite 315
Tampa, FL, 33607-1796, United States
Phone: 813-636-8100 Toll Free: 800-749-2257 Fax : 813-636-8122 Email: info@aakp.org Url: http://www.aakp.org
Name: American Kidney Fund, Inc. 6110 Executive Boulevard Suite 1010
Rockville, MD, 20852, United States
Phone: 301-881-3052 Toll Free: 866-300-2900 Email: helpline@kidneyfund.org Url: http://www.kidneyfund.org
Name: KCCure Email: https://kccure.org/contact/ Url: https://kccure.org/

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