Primary lateral sclerosis

How is primary lateral sclerosis diagnosed?

A diagnosis of primary lateral sclerosis (PLS) may be suspected based on the presence of characteristic signs and symptoms. Several different medical tests may then be ordered to confirm the diagnosis and rule out other conditions (such as multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) that can be associated with similar features. These tests may include:

Although a preliminary diagnosis of PLS can be made after other conditions are ruled out, it may take repeated testing over three to four years to confirm the diagnosis.

Last updated on 05-01-20

How might primary lateral sclerosis be treated?

The treatment of primary lateral sclerosis (PLS) is based on the signs and symptoms present in each person. For example, certain medications may be prescribed to treat the muscle stiffness and/or pain that can be associated with the condition. Physical therapy and occupational therapy can help maintain muscle strength, flexibility and range of motion, and may prevent joint immobility. Assistive devices such as braces, canes, walkers or wheelchairs may be needed for continued mobility. Speech therapy may be recommended when facial muscles are involved.

Last updated on 05-01-20

Name: Spastic Paraplegia Foundation SPF 1605 Goularte Place
Fremont, CA, 94539-7241, United States
Phone: 1-877-773-4483 Fax : 1-877-773-4483 Email: information@sp-foundation.org Url: https://sp-foundation.org/
Name: Motor Neurone Disease Association PO Box 246 Northampton Intl NN1 2PR
United Kingdom
Phone: 44 160 4 250505 Email: enquiries@mndassociation.org Url: http://www.mndassociation.org
Name: The ALS Association 1275 K Street, N.W. Suite 250
Washington, DC, 20005,
Phone: 202-407-8580 Toll Free: 1-800-782-4747 Fax : 202-464-8869 Email: alsinfo@alsa-national.org Url: http://www.alsa.org

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The RareGuru disease database is regularly updated using data generously provided by GARD, the United States Genetic and Rare Disease Information Center.

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