Peeling skin syndrome

How might peeling skin syndrome be treated?

There is currently no cure for peeling skin syndrome and unfortunately, no effective treatment has been reported. Topical emollients (skin softening ointments) may help; plain petroleum jelly has been used by some individuals. Keratolytic agents might speed up shedding and improve appearance. Treatments such as methotrexate, UVB phototherapy, isotretinoin, and oral corticosteroid therapy have been found to be ineffective in past studies.

Last updated on 05-01-20

Is gene therapy a potential treatment for peeling skin syndrome?

Gene therapy is currently available only in a research setting, and it is not available for most disorders. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has not yet approved any gene therapy products for sale in the United States. However, hundreds of research studies (clinical trials) are under way to test gene therapy as a treatment for genetic conditions, cancer, and HIV/AIDS. ClinicalTrials.gov, a service of the National Institutes of Health, provides easy access to information on clinical trials. You can search for specific trials or browse by condition or trial sponsor. You may wish to refer to a list of gene therapy trials that are accepting (or will accept) participants.

Last updated on 05-01-20

Name: Foundation for Ichthyosis and Related Skin Types FIRST 2616 North Broad Street
Colmar, PA, 18915 , United States
Phone: +1-215-997-9400 Toll Free: 1-800-545-3286 Email: info@firstskinfoundation.org Url: http://www.firstskinfoundation.org/
Name: Genetic Skin Disease Center Stanford Medical Dermatology Clinic Stanford Medicine Outpatient Center
450 Broadway Pavilion B, 4th Floor
Redwood City, CA, 94063, United States
Phone: 650-723-6316 Fax : 650-725-7711 Url: http://dermatology.stanford.edu/contact/

Connect with other users with Peeling skin syndrome on the RareGuru app

Do you have information about a disease, disorder, or syndrome? Want to suggest a symptom?
Please send suggestions to RareGuru!

The RareGuru disease database is regularly updated using data generously provided by GARD, the United States Genetic and Rare Disease Information Center.

People Using the App

Join the RareGuru Community

To connect, share, empower and heal today.

People Using the App