Hydrocephalus due to congenital stenosis of aqueduct of sylvius

How is hydrocephalus due to congenital stenosis of aqueduct of sylvius diagnosed?

A diagnosis of hydrocephalus due to congenital stenosis of aqueduct of sylvius is typically suspected based on the presence of characteristic signs and symptoms on physical examination and/or brain imaging (i.e. CT scan, MRI scan). Identification of a change (mutation) in the L1CAM gene can be used to confirm the diagnosis.

Last updated on 05-01-20

Is hydrocephalus due to congenital stenosis of aqueduct of sylvius inherited?

Hydrocephalus due to congenital stenosis of aqueduct of sylvius is inherited in an X-linked recessive manner. A condition is X-linked if the responsible gene is located on the X chromosome. The X chromosome is one of the two sex chromosomes (the other sex chromosome is the Y chromosome). Females have two X chromosomes in each cell and males have an X chromosome and a Y chromosome in each cell.

Although females have two X chromosomes, one of the X chromosomes in each cell is "turned off" and all of the genes on that chromosome are inactivated. Females who have a change (mutation) in a gene on one of their X chromosomes are called carriers of the related condition. Carrier females usually do not have symptoms of the condition because the X chromosome with the mutated gene is often turned off and they have another X chromosome with a working copy of the gene. Sometimes, the X chromosome with the working copy of the gene is turned off, which may cause symptoms of the condition. However, females with symptoms are usually much more mildly affected than males.

A male has only one X chromosome, so if he inherits a mutation on the X chromosome, he will have signs and symptoms (be affected).

Males with an X-linked recessive condition always pass the mutated gene to all of their daughters, who will be carriers. A male cannot pass an X-linked gene to his sons because males always pass their Y chromosome to male offspring.

Female carriers of an X-linked recessive condition have a 25% chance with each pregnancy to have a carrier daughter like themselves, a 25% chance to have a non-carrier daughter, a 25% chance to have an affected son, and a 25% chance to have an unaffected son. This also means that each daughter of a carrier mother has a 50% chance of being a carrier, and each son has a 50% chance of having the condition.

Last updated on 05-01-20

How might hydrocephalus due to congenital stenosis of aqueduct of sylvius be treated?

The treatment of hydrocephalus due to congenital stenosis of aqueduct of sylvius (HSAS) is based on the signs and symptoms present in each person. For example, hydrocephalus is typically treated with shunt surgery. Special education and early intervention may be recommended for children with intellectual disability. Although intervention is rarely necessary for adducted thumbs (bent towards the palms), tendon transfer surgery or splinting may be suggested in some cases.

Last updated on 05-01-20

Name: Hydrocephalus Association 4340 East West Highway Suite 905
Bethesda, MD, 20814, United States
Phone: +1-301-202-3811 Toll Free: 1-888-598-3789 Fax : +1-301-202-3813 Email: info@hydroassoc.org Url: https://www.hydroassoc.org/
Stumpel C & Vos YJ. L1 syndrome GeneReviews. March 5, 2015; Reference Link

Connect with other users with Hydrocephalus due to congenital stenosis of aqueduct of sylvius on the RareGuru app

Do you have information about a disease, disorder, or syndrome? Want to suggest a symptom?
Please send suggestions to RareGuru!

The RareGuru disease database is regularly updated using data generously provided by GARD, the United States Genetic and Rare Disease Information Center.

People Using the App

Join the RareGuru Community

To connect, share, empower and heal today.

People Using the App